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    Where to Watch Birds in Morocco

    € 21,95 4 In stock: Ordered on working days before 17:00, shipped the same day.
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    Product description

    AuthorsPatrick & Fédora Bergier
    ISBN9781784271442
    PublisherPelagic Publishing 
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages166
    Size24,5 x 17 cm
    Formatpaperback
    Illustrations maps and drawings in black and white
    Year published 2017, reprint Prion's Birdwatchers' Guide to Morocco 2003
     

    Morocco's proximity and the variety of its habitats and bird species make it a favoured destination for birders. It is home to rare and endangered species such as Bald Ibis, Dark Chanting Goshawk, Tawny Eagle, Eleonora's Falcon and African Marsh Owl. 454 species have been recorded, of which 209 breed in the country. As this statistic implies, millions of West European migrants pass seasonally through Morocco. Several wetlands spread along the Atlantic coast are famous for their migrant and wintering waders and gulls. The Atlas ranges are notable for their avifauna and desert species, including larks, wheatears and sandgrouses are found in the Saharan rim. This authoritative book describes over 50 birdwatching sites across Morocco.

    This book is a reprint of Prion's Birdwatchers' Guide to Morocco 

    Specifications

    Article number
    9781784271442
    EAN
    9781784271442

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    Where to Watch Birds in Morocco
    € 21,95
    Where to Watch Birds in Morocco
    4 In stock: Ordered on working days before 17:00, shipped the same day.
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